ISSUE BRIEF #1

schedule ] requirements.html ] ISSUES LAB  SCHEDULE ]

FIRST DRAFT DUE: September 19 NOON, via email
FINAL REVISIONS DUE: September 27, via email

TOPIC: the one you have chosen from your list prepared the first day.

FORMAT: Two or three pages, typed, single spaced, not counting citations. All papers must be submitted electronically as Microsoft Word readable files.

ALL SOURCES MUST BE CITED IN THE TEXT LITERATURE CITED MUST BE LISTED AT THE END (Does not count as part of the 2-3 pp)

CONTENT: An Issue Brief begins by stating the question or problem, explaining in a paragraph the nature and important causes of that problem. It gives the reader the major background facts and figures that show the dimensions of the problem. It cites relevant treaties, laws, rules, etc. 

The brief then lists and explains several alternative courses of action proposed to deal with the problem, which may range from doing nothing (always an important alternative) to taking a series of specific actions. 

For each option describe the probable effects, positive and negative, of following that plan. Your brief should say what values or interests are benefited by each alternative and which are harmed. 

Your brief should conclude by recommending one of the proposed courses of action and explaining your reasons for choosing that one. State clearly what ethical principles you are upholding by choosing as you do.

Checklist for checking, revising and proofreading your brief. Try it with a classmate!

Here are a few useful links for getting started.

Stockton Library     and    Environmental Resources Page

Sample Issue Brief from the Congressional Research Service. This one co-authored by a former Stockton faculty member (Corn). Longer and more detailed than i want, but it shows the idea.

National Library for the Environment Lots more sample briefs, as well as other information

GEO Global Environmental Outlook.

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